Blogs



  Three stories jolted me in quick succession last week.
A good predictor tool for rework and cost impact on a construction project is the Field Rework Index (FRI). Take a past project on which you have good data on rework, waste and costs. Then cast your mind back to the design and construction stages of that project and then score each of the question listed below from 1-5, with 1 being the best rating. You can also do this evaluation as a team. See if this score is giving an accurate estimate of rework and cost impact based on your hard data on that past project.
This 2,800-square-foot plan utilizes Lean design to combat narrow-lot woes.
In the fall of 1998, I attended my first Benchmark Conference as a new senior editor on Professional Builder magazine. What struck me about the gathering was the camaraderie among industry competitors. It was a large group, about 300 attendees, and yet it felt like a small reunion of old friends. And, as our columnist Scott Sedam told me when I met him there, not only was it a reunion of old friends, but it was also a continuation of the same conversation—how to sell more, build better, build faster and drop more money to the bottom line.
As we continue to distance ourselves from an economic downturn that had a deep impact on the remodeling industry, one key variable is still evolving at a brisk pace and that is the introduction of new products to the remodeling industry. Rarely a day goes by without a new product announcement landing in an email in box of the Professional Remodeler editorial staff. Of course, the pace picks up in the days and weeks prior to the industry’s major trade shows when dozens of new products are unveiled.
  We were winning by several touchdowns when I got the nod. “Just hand the ball off, stay in bounds, & keep the clock running...” 
Benchmarking is a technique in which a company measures its performance against that of best in class companies, determines how those companies achieved their performance levels and uses the information to improve its own performance. Subjects that can be benchmarked include strategies, operations and processes. (ASQ) There are two forms of benchmarking: Performance: analysis of relative business performance through key performance metrics. Process/Functional: analysis of key processes and functions. The process for benchmarking is:
Imagine you are in a cement box quickly filling up with water. The box is sealed on all sides, yet you still find a way out and survive. How? I will get back to that one. This week we have a plan that works to solve the riddles presented by today’s buyers. Let’s take a closer look:
Yesterday, I had the opportunity to visit a group of homes that were featured in Chicago’s first GreenBuilt Home Tour. Sponsored by the U.S. Green Building Council-Illinois Chapter, the tour included 16 sites that are third-party certified, including the area’s first Passive House, DOE Challenge Homes, LEED-certified homes, and National Green Building Standard-certified homes.
Remodeling and custom home building are similar in that both are ‘high touch’ relationships. Not to say that production home building is not high touch; but there is a gap. People who build one-of-a-kind custom houses expect a lot of your time when they commission you to design and/or build their next home. Nobody wants to feel like they are ‘owned’ for any period of time, but if you were somehow able to crawl into the mindset of most clients, they feel like they ‘own’ a good portion of your time during the building process.
On August 8-11, the Timber Framers Guild (TFG) will hold its 2013 National Conference at Champlain College in Burlington, Vt. The event has been going on since1985 and promises something for everyone — even the kids.
I had the distinct pleasure of attending the first Pacific Coast Builders Conference (PCBC) ever held in San Diego. Previously, it had been staged in San Francisco for more than 50 years. I was not sure what to expect this year, but the combination of a new venue and an improving market certainly netted a positive result.
  Dwell magazine recently featured a Pittsburgh home made of recycled glass and steel that stands apart in a neighborhood filled with opulent mansions and brick cottages. The owner purchased (sight unseen) a 140-year-old farmhouse on the site, but decided to tear it down after discovering it was riddled with dry rot and mold.
Where else can a former Marine, college football player, sheepherder, alligator hunter, and professional chef come together and share a commonality? The answer, of course, is Professional Remodeler’s 40 Under 40 program. 
What do you do if a previous best-selling plan hits the skids? Dump it, pitch it, give it the old heave-ho? Possibly, but many builders are using another strategy. All throughout the country builders are taking a fresh look at their existing plans and re-imagining their existing Turnberrys and Devonshires as a vehicle to greatly increase sales and profits. 

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