Quality Management



One of Demings ‘Seven Deadly Diseases’ is ‘The Emphasis on Short-Term Profits’ and therefore on short term thinking. Despite the lessons of the recession, so much of corporate thinking is still driven by the short term view.

Here is a simple exercise to help you reflect on your leadership.

Make two lists.  One is headed, ‘leadership I respected and valued’, the other will have the heading of ‘poor leadership’.

Under ‘leadership I respected and valued’ list examples you have experienced.  To do this think about someone in your career that you respected and valued, this might be someone that was a mentor (whether they knew it or not) a great boss, you father, a team lead that you really enjoyed working with. What are the things that inspired you.

“The overall purpose of a site visit is to reveal the truth about the organization and provide a thorough assessment.” Brown, Baldrige Award Winning Quality, 2005.

You too can have such an impartial evaluation of your business by applying for the National Housing Quality Award. Take a look at the criteria and use it to evaluate your business, consider where you can improve your bottomline.

http://www.housingzone.com/sites/default/files/FinalNHQApplication.pdf

The ACORN test is an easy to remember way to evaluate the charter of an improvement project.

A  Accomplishment. Does the goal actually focus on results?

C  Control.  Does the team have control of what is needed to implement and complete the project?

O  Objective. Is the objective the ultimate achievement of the project or is it actually a sub goal?

R  Reconciliation.  No other improvement teams have the same goals as your team and so there re no conflicts.

“The stories, apocryphal or not, that circulate in an organization reveal its devotion (or lack of it) to quality, and serve to inspire its people to live (or not live) the quality message.”

What stories are being told in your company?

Tom Peters & Nancy Austin, A Passion for Excellence: The Leadership Difference, 1985

"What we hear too often is, don't confuse me with the facts, I know what I want to do." Bill Denney PhD

Technology has made gathering data so much easier. However, the problem is we can be overwhelmed by it. Surveys, stats, city, state and national data sources can be accessed and reams of paper can be printed to provide us with the information we need. But the key is interpreting that data, knowing how to use it, knowing what it is telling us. Where are the gaps in the market, what are price points that customers can afford etc. The key is to gather data and then analyze it and make decisions on that data, not on gut feel.

The focus is the customer, it’s about their needs and wants. Sometimes when we try to improve our customer focus and we try to achieve a ‘wow factor’ we actually just add fluff, which at best is window dressing which doesn’t do any harm, but nor does it have benefit and it still adds cost and time. But in the worst case adding fluff can lose you a customer.

Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a tool that can assist in identifying where your areas of risk lie and helps structure solutions.

In 1989 Warren Bennis published ‘On Becoming a Leader’ which became a key leadership book. He stated that leaders “know who they are, what their strengths and weaknesses are, and how to fully deploy their strengths and compensate for their weaknesses.” The key of course is compensating for weaknesses, not ignoring them.

The honest study of the strengths and weaknesses of an organization should also be studied and again, the weaknesses compensated for, but not ignored.

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