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Imagine yourself walking into McDonalds and ordering lunch (if you are anything like me this would probably not be a huge stretch). You walk up to the counter and ask the cashier for a Big Mac. During your order you ask her to hold the two all-beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles and onions. She looks at you like you are some kind of freak and hands you a sesame seed bun.
I recently saw the movie "MoneyBall" with Brad Pitt as the lead playing a GM of the Oakland A’s baseball team. For the readers who have not seen the film, I won’t give away the major plot and ruin your experience. The film had many correlations to our leadership options in homebuilding. This is what struck me as being very relevant to our decisions as leaders today.
Are you curious? Sometimes I wonder just how curious people really are. For example do you talking to those next to you at conferences?  I don’t mean about where they are from or other generalities about their company, but rather to find out how and where they can help you improve in your business.  I am always surprised to find people attending conferences that listen intently to the speakers but somehow don’t think about talking with fellow, attendees despite the fact that they are also at that event with the aim to learn new ideas and improve.
Big Q and little q is a term coined by Dr Juran and is key in fully understanding quality. It contrasts the difference between managing for quality in all aspects of business process, products and services which is Big Q.  While little q relates to a much more limited capacity. For example not taking the larger picture into consideration but rather just focusing on a product itself. Big Q is about a broad, strategic and complex perspective and little q is about a micro aspect an operational issue such as quality control.
Yes believe it or not we can learn a lot from the simple peanut butter and jelly sandwich. While this is very simple it is also a low cost, fun and engaging way that you can tap into a whole range of issues. This is an ideal approach for those new to quality as a method of introduction, but even for those that have been involved with process improvement this can be a fun workshop to help refocus. It can also be conducted as a small breakout session lasting just a few minutes or as a long workshop. The issues this can address include:
If there’s one theme that runs through this year’s Professional Remodeler Design Awards, presented this month, it’s practical. After years of seeing over-the-top remodels that, frankly, didn’t always make a lot of sense (does anyone really need a $250,000 bathroom?), it’s a refreshing change.
Look ma! The war cry for young show offs world wide. I’m sure you have had a “look ma” moment or two in your life. I don’t know about you but mine typically ended with skinned knees and tears.
In the past month I have had the opportunity to present to and spend time with two different groups of 25 successful, independent lumber & material dealers. These suppliers have weathered the storm and although bruised and battered are still alive. In each one of their markets, significant competitors have been fed through the proverbial chipper and are no more. These survivors are smart, savvy business people. I was impressed by their dedication and knowledge, both of their operations and about how builders work.
Recently, there has been a lot of press about football player’s compensation. Specifically, many of the new contracts written for superstar quarter backs have had press showing over $100 million to several hundred million dollar packages. What the press doesn’t tell you is the compensation is made up of a relatively smaller fixed salary with a huge variable incentive plan. Our industry could learn a thing or two regarding this sports model of compensation.
  Jane McNamara is a tech-savvy CEO of a non-profit agency in Michigan. In February of this year, she bought a second home in Florida from Bonita Springs, Fla.-based WCI Communities. When she signed the contract, the sales agent handed her an iPad preloaded with MyWCi, an application that organized all of her home-buyer documents and gave her instant contact with all of her WCI contacts. It put a host of information at her fingertips and allowed her to share photos and news about her new home with family and friends.
Both my grandfathers were self-made men who did well during the Great Depression and retired quite comfortably, if not wealthy by today’s standards. Each began with an 8th grade education and nothing backing them up but grit and determination, and each feeling graced by having survived serious crashes on Indian motorcycles. My mother’s dad started as a packing boy at General Electric in Youngstown, Ohio at age 15 and retired at age 65 as plant general superintendent. Fifty years of service with one company. Just imagine. He had a lot of plaques on the wall thanking “E.
I have been fortunate enough to be working with Jeff Rutt and Matt Collins from Keystone Custom Homes, Perry Bigelow from Bigelow Homes, and several other great folks on a housing solution for Haiti. The overriding concept is to help alleviate the housing crisis by providing qualified Haitians with Micro Loans and assisting them in building their own house. The passion and commitment for this cause is infectious. It has been, and continues to be, a very rewarding experience.
I recently conducted an online survey of over 1200 home building employees. The survey asked the question,” If the US market was good today, would you strongly consider leaving your current employer”?  The options in answering this question were; 1.      In a Heartbeat 2.      Yes 3.      Maybe
In a recent discussion regarding the impact of quality on the ASQ Design & Construction Division Linkedin Group, a member made the comment that ‘everything made by man is defective.’ Of course this is correct, we cannot create perfection. It was a wonderful comment and it made me ponder perfection in construction and to think of some of the world’s most ancient and iconic buildings and be reminded of just how long quality and construction have been associated.
In every industry I have worked in, Communication seems to be the common denominator, of dysfunctionality. We write books about, train our leaders on it and spend countless hours using technology today to attempt to convey our thoughts. Sadly though, the form outweighs the substance. When I am involved in a consulting project involving the people of an organization, the number one issue that surfaces is the confusion, misinterpretation and anxiety surrounding communication.
Eric Tiffin our magically talented Project Manager brought up the idea of writing about point loads this week. My first thought was that there may not be much to write about with this topic. He convinced me otherwise.
You know that phenomenon where you hear a reasonable sounding, logical guy armed with facts that presents an convincing analysis of a problem and his solution and you think, “You know, he’s right” … and then you hear another logical guy armed with facts that presents a totally contrary analysis of the identical problem and a completely different solution and you think, “Whoa, wait a minute … HE is right … I think … maybe.” So now you don’t know who to believe and then it occurs to you that had you heard just ONE of these two guys, you’d be in his camp, probably quoting him to your friends,
Wisdom is timeless, which is why two Harvard Business Review articles published in 2001 and 2008 are still as valid and thought provoking today as when they were published. (The references to the papers are listed at the end of this blog.) In an economic crisis and industry downturn Rigby considers that there are three phases and critical dos and don’ts to be aware of in each stage.  Reflect on how you reacted in phases 1 & 2 and how you plan to react as phase 3 emerges. 1. Storm clouds gather. Don’t act as if the storm will blow over.
From 1979 to 2001 I worked in high level positions within corporate America. I was always surprised over the number of consultants that called offering their advice, solutions and their roadmap to success. So in 2001, when I decided to broaden my scope nationally and offer my consulting services. I was always very conscience of my approach. Initially, I actually had CEO’s tell me that they felt I was more interested in the sale than I could ever be about their success. This was a certain wake up call.
For over 30 years I have worked with executives that indicate they are interested in improving their skills, leadership ability or their overall company performance. About two thirds of that time was as a corporate officer and the balance as a consultant. In the old days, exploring the strengths, areas of development and desires of the executive wasn’t called coaching. In fact, many executives at that time would have taken offense to the term.

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