10 most expensive U.S. housing markets

For the second straight year, Newport Beach, Calif., topped Coldwell Banker's list of the most expensive U.S. real estate markets, with an average home listing price of approximately $2.5 million. Saratoga, Calif., Weston, Mass., and Greenwich, Conn., are among the other cities to make the firm's top-10 most costly housing markets for 2011.

June 16, 2011
housing market, market growth, housing market growth, home price, expensive home

Newport Beach, Calif., topped the list of most expensive U.S. real estate markets for the second year in a row, according to Coldwell Banker, with an average home listing price of approximately $2.5 million for property listings meeting the subject home criteria.

Coldwell Banker Real Estate’s Home Listing Report (HLR) compiles information on real estate data from around the U.S. and Canada for homebuyers and sellers. The report then provides the average home listing price of four-bedroom, two-bathroom properties on the Coldwell Banker website that were listed between September 2010 and March 2011 from more than 2,300 North American markets.

Out of the ten most expensive real estate markets, six come from California.

The top ten most expensive markets are:

  1. Newport Beach, Calif., with an average listing price of $2,537,126
  2. Pacific Palisades, Calif., with an average listing price of $1,606,992
  3. Stone Harbor, N.J., with an average listing price of $1,344,908
  4. Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif., with an average listing price of $1,312,538
  5. Saratoga, Calif., with an average listing price of $1,281,889
  6. Los Gatos, Calif., with an average listing price of $1,261,176
  7. Weston, Mass., with an average listing price of $1,228,100
  8. Greenwich, Conn., with an average listing price of $1,154,293
  9. Mercer Island, Wash., with an average listing price of $1,143,521
  10. Cupertino, Calif., with an average listing price of $1,140,656

 

For more information: http://hlr.coldwellbanker.com/PressRelease.html

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